Puzzles
#11
(02-12-2021, 04:06 PM)PaigeofTimes Wrote: Fascinating, but WAY over my paygrade.  It'll be interesting to see more replies from those attempting decode.

It's been a hobby for years.

Have a look at this..

If you look at the post #9 above about ROT 13, in this case it's ROT 26 x 3.

The largest number is 77, so..

A to Z = 26

A to Z = 26 + 26 or, 26 to 52

A to Z = 26 + 26 + 26 or, 52 to 78

https://www.instructables.com/HOW-TO-SOL...COORDINAT/

Half the population at Base Camp was clinically delusional.
-- John Krakauer 1996 Everest Expedition.

Apophenia is : “the tendency to perceive a connection or meaningful pattern between unrelated or random things (such as objects or ideas)”
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#12
I am sure I don't have to tell anyone... the placement of that puzzle and lighting is key.
Look at the shadow, perhaps from the northeast, or when it is cast to the northeast.
I am sure the shadow is part of the puzzle.

Good luck!
Heartflowers
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#13
(02-12-2021, 04:50 PM)PickleSnout Wrote: I am sure I don't have to tell anyone... the placement of that puzzle and lighting is key.
Look at the shadow, perhaps from the northeast, or when it is cast to the northeast.
I am sure the shadow is part of the puzzle.

Good luck!

Yeah and, as you know, the lighting will change direction during the daylight hours and, will again change as the Earth makes it's way around the sun. I took note of the position of the bench. I think, it's siting is critical.

And don't forget, the solution of the 4th element then is taken with the other 3, to make an additional 5th, more difficult, puzzle.

Chuckle

Half the population at Base Camp was clinically delusional.
-- John Krakauer 1996 Everest Expedition.

Apophenia is : “the tendency to perceive a connection or meaningful pattern between unrelated or random things (such as objects or ideas)”
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#14
(02-12-2021, 04:28 PM)Max Gravity Wrote:
(02-12-2021, 04:06 PM)PaigeofTimes Wrote: Fascinating, but WAY over my paygrade.  It'll be interesting to see more replies from those attempting decode.

It's been a hobby for years.

Have a look at this..

If you look at the post #9 above about ROT 13, in this case it's ROT 26 x 3.

The largest number is 77, so..

A to Z = 26

A to Z = 26 + 26 or, 26 to 52

A to Z = 26 + 26 + 26 or, 52 to 78

https://www.instructables.com/HOW-TO-SOL...COORDINAT/

It's Friday, the beginning of a long weekend and I'm drinking. No way I'm 'getting this' tonight. Chuckle

Plus, I excelled in English and History classes. Math - I don't know how to convey how intimidating math was after 11th grade level.

Facepalm
If you're happy and you know it share your meds!
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#15
(02-12-2021, 06:19 PM)PaigeofTimes Wrote:
(02-12-2021, 04:28 PM)Max Gravity Wrote:
(02-12-2021, 04:06 PM)PaigeofTimes Wrote: Fascinating, but WAY over my paygrade.  It'll be interesting to see more replies from those attempting decode.

It's been a hobby for years.

Have a look at this..

If you look at the post #9 above about ROT 13, in this case it's ROT 26 x 3.

The largest number is 77, so..

A to Z = 26

A to Z = 26 + 26 or, 26 to 52

A to Z = 26 + 26 + 26 or, 52 to 78

https://www.instructables.com/HOW-TO-SOL...COORDINAT/

It's Friday, the beginning of a long weekend and I'm drinking.  No way I'm 'getting this' tonight.  Chuckle

Plus, I excelled in English and History classes.  Math - I don't know how to convey how intimidating math was after 11th grade level.

Facepalm

I doesn't involve much math now that it's solved. Just look through the examples at the link. They're very clear and simple. Once you see the numbers and letters printed out, they'll make sense.

1 = A

2 = B

3 = C

etc.

Once reaching 26, then..

27 = A

28 = B

29 = C

etc.


Part of the decrypting is removing the nonsense from the content. Then, getting the English (in this case) translated into numbers.

Then, the numbers back into English.

Once you've seen this done, you look for patterns in other crypto. It's a lot about Pattern Recognition.

James Angleton was an English major at Yale. Not a cryptographer by trade but, he knew his stuff.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Jesus_Angleton

https://theintercept.com/2018/01/01/the-...-angleton/

As Cryptographers go Whit Diffie is one of the best. I don't know who the best is. Diffie is an odd guy in that, he didn't learn to read until age 10, but, he's an obvious 2% er.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitfield_Diffie

Snip
Whitfield Diffie took cryptography out of the hands of the spooks and made privacy possible in the digital age - by inventing the most revolutionary concept in encryption since the Renaissance.
https://www.wired.com/1994/11/diffie/

The Krypto Sculpture is a big puzzle. Modern digital data encryption, at it's best, involves huge prime numbers.

Half the population at Base Camp was clinically delusional.
-- John Krakauer 1996 Everest Expedition.

Apophenia is : “the tendency to perceive a connection or meaningful pattern between unrelated or random things (such as objects or ideas)”
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#16
(02-12-2021, 07:10 PM)Max Gravity Wrote:
(02-12-2021, 06:19 PM)PaigeofTimes Wrote:
(02-12-2021, 04:28 PM)Max Gravity Wrote: It's been a hobby for years.

Have a look at this..

If you look at the post #9 above about ROT 13, in this case it's ROT 26 x 3.

The largest number is 77, so..

A to Z = 26

A to Z = 26 + 26 or, 26 to 52

A to Z = 26 + 26 + 26 or, 52 to 78

https://www.instructables.com/HOW-TO-SOL...COORDINAT/

It's Friday, the beginning of a long weekend and I'm drinking.  No way I'm 'getting this' tonight.  Chuckle

Plus, I excelled in English and History classes.  Math - I don't know how to convey how intimidating math was after 11th grade level.

Facepalm

I doesn't involve much math now that it's solved. Just look through the examples at the link. They're very clear and simple. Once you see the numbers and letters printed out, they'll make sense.

1 = A

2 = B

3 = C

etc.

Once reaching 26, then..

27 = A

28 = B

29 = C

etc.


Part of the decrypting is removing the nonsense from the content. Then, getting the English (in this case) translated into numbers.

Then, the numbers back into English.

Once you've seen this done, you look for patterns in other crypto. It's a lot about Pattern Recognition.

James Angleton was an English major at Yale. Not a cryptographer by trade but, he knew his stuff.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Jesus_Angleton

https://theintercept.com/2018/01/01/the-...-angleton/

As Cryptographers go Whit Diffie is one of the best. I don't know who the best is. Diffie is an odd guy in that, he didn't learn to read until age 10, but, he's an obvious 2% er.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitfield_Diffie

Snip
Whitfield Diffie took cryptography out of the hands of the spooks and made privacy possible in the digital age - by inventing the most revolutionary concept in encryption since the Renaissance.
https://www.wired.com/1994/11/diffie/

The Krypto Sculpture is a big puzzle. Modern digital data encryption, at it's best, involves huge prime numbers.


I started into this thread last night..... Fascinating. For those interested, Here is Whit Diffie delivering his Keynote address on the history of Cryptology ay SunMicro

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0go6a73Vm8
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#17
Also, what if the bench is not an observation spot, but a pointer?
This is interesting. I kinda wish that was scanned into 3d so I could change axis on the site and mimic sunshine and seasons.

I am thinking of native american trailsign, and can't ignore how that could have impact on solving this. Gunsights to cache, water signs, ect.

Why go through the trouble to make it 3d, if it is a flat paper puzzle?
Heartflowers
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#18
[Image: E7KMVUr.png]


Snip
The Vigenère cipher (French pronunciation: [viʒnɛːʁ]) is a method of encrypting alphabetic text by using a series of interwoven Caesar ciphers, based on the letters of a keyword. It employs a form of polyalphabetic substitution.[1][2]

First described by Giovan Battista Bellaso in 1553, the cipher is easy to understand and implement, but it resisted all attempts to break it until 1863, three centuries later. This earned it the description le chiffre indéchiffrable (French for 'the indecipherable cipher'). Many people have tried to implement encryption schemes that are essentially Vigenère ciphers.[3] In 1863, Friedrich Kasiski was the first to publish a general method of deciphering Vigenère ciphers.

In the 19th century the scheme was misattributed to Blaise de Vigenère (1523–1596), and so acquired its present name.[4]


Snip
NOTE, the formatting on PHP doesn't always translate some graphics well. See the link below for a better graphics presentatiom. max

Description
[Image: 220px-Vigen%C3%A8re_square_shading.svg.png]

The Vigenère square or Vigenère table, also known as the tabula recta, can be used for encryption and decryption.
In a Caesar cipher, each letter of the alphabet is shifted along some number of places. For example, in a Caesar cipher of shift 3,
Code:
A
would become
Code:
D
,
Code:
B
would become
Code:
E
,
Code:
Y
would become
Code:
B
and so on. The Vigenère cipher has several Caesar ciphers in sequence with different shift values.
To encrypt, a table of alphabets can be used, termed a tabula recta, Vigenère square or Vigenère table. It has the alphabet written out 26 times in different rows, each alphabet shifted cyclically to the left compared to the previous alphabet, corresponding to the 26 possible Caesar ciphers. At different points in the encryption process, the cipher uses a different alphabet from one of the rows. The alphabet used at each point depends on a repeating keyword.[citation needed]
For example, suppose that the plaintext to be encrypted is

Code:
ATTACKATDAWN
.
The person sending the message chooses a keyword and repeats it until it matches the length of the plaintext, for example, the keyword "LEMON":

Code:
LEMONLEMONLE

Each row starts with a key letter. The rest of the row holds the letters A to Z (in shifted order). Although there are 26 key rows shown, a code will use only as many keys (different alphabets) as there are unique letters in the key string, here just 5 keys: {L, E, M, O, N}. For successive letters of the message, successive letters of the key string will be taken and each message letter enciphered by using its corresponding key row. The next letter of the key is chosen, and that row is gone along to find the column heading that matches the message character. The letter at the intersection of [key-row, msg-col] is the enciphered letter.
For example, the first letter of the plaintext,
Code:
A
, is paired with
Code:
L
, the first letter of the key. Therefore, column
Code:
L
and row
Code:
A
of the Vigenère square are used, namely
Code:
L
. Similarly, for the second letter of the plaintext, the second letter of the key is used. The letter at row
Code:
E
and column
Code:
T
is
Code:
X
. The rest of the plaintext is enciphered in a similar fashion:
Plaintext:
Code:
ATTACKATDAWN

Key:
Code:
LEMONLEMONLE

Ciphertext:
Code:
LXFOPVEFRNHR

Decryption is performed by going to the row in the table corresponding to the key, finding the position of the ciphertext letter in that row and then using the column's label as the plaintext. For example, in row
Code:
L
(from LEMON), the ciphertext
Code:
L
appears in column
Code:
A
, which is the first plaintext letter. Next, in row
Code:
E
(from LEMON), the ciphertext
Code:
X
is located in column
Code:
T
. Thus
Code:
T
is the second plaintext letter.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vigen%C3%A8re_cipher

Half the population at Base Camp was clinically delusional.
-- John Krakauer 1996 Everest Expedition.

Apophenia is : “the tendency to perceive a connection or meaningful pattern between unrelated or random things (such as objects or ideas)”
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#19
Vigenere Cipher

Online encoder / decoder


https://www.dcode.fr/vigenere-cipher

https://cryptii.com/pipes/vigenere-cipher


Learn how to use it manually for a better understanding before relying on the software.

Half the population at Base Camp was clinically delusional.
-- John Krakauer 1996 Everest Expedition.

Apophenia is : “the tendency to perceive a connection or meaningful pattern between unrelated or random things (such as objects or ideas)”
Like Reply
#20
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkJcmCaHqS0

Half the population at Base Camp was clinically delusional.
-- John Krakauer 1996 Everest Expedition.

Apophenia is : “the tendency to perceive a connection or meaningful pattern between unrelated or random things (such as objects or ideas)”
Like Reply


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