Gasohol
#51
Or you could go big diesel.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v55B5aOqAZw

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Or no diesel.

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#52
Damned gasbuddy.

Has a price report for everything except real gas unless the gas station is all real gas.

Then it tries to determine price gap in the area including the places with real gas,when all it takes is gasohol.

Ham Slap Ham Slap Ham Slap
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#53
Unobtainable

Solar and wind just can’t compare to fossil fuel.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QINRoj_DrwI
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#54
(03-27-2021, 09:30 PM)=42 Wrote:
(03-27-2021, 08:49 PM)counterintelligence Wrote:
(03-27-2021, 08:45 PM)=42 Wrote: It has less energy. Tuners wanting to increase HP will convert to ethanol, but they have to get higher volume fuel pumps and larger injectors. The advantages and gains are realized by the higher volumes of ethanol absorbing more heat in the cylinders allowing the engines to run cooler.
Which is the lost leader that the government leaders are buying off on to make us all use it.

I should have clarified my comments above refer to E85 which not as widely available as E15.

The idea of using corn or other crops to replace gasoline is ridiculous in many ways including creating a demand that competes with animal feed thus driving up the cost and even if they used 100% of the crop land (stop growing food for humans) they won't come close to meeting demand for fuel. 

E85 (Flex Fuel)
E85 is the most common form of flex fuel available on the market. Because ethanol is corn-based, E85 gas is readily available in the Midwest region of the United States. It's less available in other regions, especially New England and the Pacific Northwest. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, there are 3300 E85 gas stations available to the public across 42 states. Outside the United States, ethanol producers often use alternative crops. In Brazil, sugar cane is a prominent source of ethanol.
Research by the U.S. Energy Information Administration shows that pure ethanol has a lower heating value than gasoline, so it makes it harder to start a car's engine in areas with a cold climate. This difficulty in cold cranking is why ethanol blends contain a fraction of gasoline. E85 gas is suitable for use in any vehicle designated as a flex-fuel vehicle by the manufacturer. Cars.com reports that flex-fuel vehicles are capable of running on both ethanol-gasoline blends and regular gasoline. Consumers can use the Department of Energy's vehicle cost calculator to determine how much a flex-fuel vehicle can save on fuel costs and greenhouse gas emissions.
Because of Brazil's relatively warmer climate, gas stations in that country can sell pure ethanol. Flex-fuel vehicles in Brazil run on E100 as opposed to the E85 that is for sale in most parts of the world. Fuel sold as E100 is always 100 percent ethanol, while fuel sold as E85 always contains 85 percent ethanol. Using a guaranteed fraction of ethanol makes it easier for a vehicle to reach peak performance and fuel economy.
In Austalia, E85 is the preferred fuel among motor racing clubs and sports car enthusiasts. The motor racing industry has always preferred ethanol- or methanol-based fuels because these fuels tend to give performance vehicles more thermal efficiency and increased torque. In an advanced engine, E85 can improve the engine's fuel consumption.
In the United States, the government has tried to encourage the production and sale of E85 by providing subsidies, particularly to corn producers in the Midwest. In 2016, the installation of new ethanol infrastructure began in 20 states, thanks to a $210 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This new infrastructure will make E15 and E85 more readily available across the country.
When fueling their flex-fuel vehicles with E85 instead of regular gasoline, drivers won't notice many differences other than a decrease in miles per gallon. Compared to gasoline, ethanol provides less energy per gallon, meaning that the higher the percentage of ethanol, the more significant the impact on fuel economy.
Depending on the driver's location and the ups and downs of the energy markets, the cost of E85 can vary greatly, especially when compared to regular gasoline and E10. While E85 gas costs less than regular gasoline at the pump, the decrease in miles per gallon makes it more expensive when driving. Despite the lower miles per gallon, flex-fuel vehicles often put out more torque and more horsepower when running on E85 instead of regular gasoline.

https://www.caranddriver.com/research/a31851426/what-is-e85-gas/
Gasohol is only about 60% BTUs and it costs more to make, so it isn’t even economical or saving the environment either one.  

https://vimeo.com/55490083

These big manufacturing plants/mass production complaining about how everyone else is using up the planet’s resources.  What a croc!  What planet do they live on?

Gasohol, saving the environment, corona virus all this elitist garbage seems to all run the same worn out gambit.
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#55
Last year I bought a garden tractor. It has a 22 hp V twin Briggs engine. It says in the manual that the use of ethanol fuel may void the warranty. 
Fortunately there is a non ethanol gas station not far from where I live. I try to fill up both vehicles with it and use it in my atv, and all garden tools. I can say that everything runs a bit smoother. I just changed the oil on my tractor after 17 hours, and it looked pretty darn clean. Plus real gas smells better. I dunno if it tastes better but that would be another thread!  Chuckle
Doin' what I can with what I got

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#56
I didn’t read all of the comments here so forgive me if this has been mentioned. Alcohol is hell on small or engines with carburetors mainly because it eats the rubber parts.
We only use alcohol free gas in the ATV’s and chainsaws.
___________________________________
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#57
(04-04-2021, 11:09 PM)Capnron Wrote: I didn’t read all of the comments here so forgive me if this has been mentioned. Alcohol is hell on small or engines with carburetors mainly because it eats the rubber parts.
We only use alcohol free gas in the ATV’s and chainsaws.
The dumb butt congressman that are hook line and sinker that the lost cause but very profitable lucrative racket known as global warming, of the tune that gasohol burns cooler forget that the drag race car engines get completely torn down and rebuilt after each race.  My Cars engine doesn't.
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#58
We could save the environment if they would make the trap it lights work better than they do.

You go from one trap it light to the next trap it light having to stop at every single one regardless of traffic volume.

We could really save gas not having to stop at the carjackers favorite hotspot. But of course he had to wait until the light was green.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yITr127KZtQ
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#59
Nice set of wheels McFly.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pd_b-ecraF8

[Image: wheels2-jpg.3914]
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#60
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