Odesa, Ukraine 2021 - Ask me anything thread
#21
I met up with my lawyer and a couple of his clients for coffee yesterday. My apartment is opposite the cafe, and it looked closed to me from where I was standing. I messaged my lawyer and said if it was closed they could come up to my apartment (we have a red zone lockdown here). He said "It'll be open for us, just buzz me when you're near and I'll let you in".

And lo and behold when I went there, there he was, and he let me in, and we sat, three English people and a NZ guy, drinking coffee for half the afternoon. How civilised. Other people also came and went - the owner knows how to keep things discreet.

I think perhaps that sums up the post-soviet mindset. 
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#22
Sunday evening was mild, so I went for a walk and found some really pretty back streets. As I wandered I suddenly heard a familiar sound - the cry of a swift, flying overhead. I will say that these birds, visitors from South Africa each Summer, are one of my great joys. I had some nesting in my house back in the UK, and although I knew they could be here (due to being in their range), I didn't know if they would be. But they are, and this summer is going to be a riot of noise once their young are fledged. 

They nest in dodgy old roofs - hence why they are dying out in gentrified Britain. Efforts to help them are working, but it's very much a slow process to increase their numbers. They are such fascinating birds, and the very best aerobatics team you'll ever see!

So in amongst the old and tatty buildings there are nests, and at the moment we only hear them in the evenings or early mornings when they are out to feed, I guess. In a few weeks there will be dozens of them swooping and screaming with joy as they fly around the rooftops. I'm delighted that they are here!

As an aside, when I sold my house I told the new buyers that there were Swifts in the roof, and to please look after them for me - it was, I think, the only time I cried. He told me that they would look after them (and the neighbour there is very knowledgeable), so hopefully they will not just thrive but increase too!

Here's a video someone took - that sound of joy Squeee squeee squee!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rd3NlfbA7yQ
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#23
I love this city! And as the weather gets warmer and warmer, the trees and flowers are beginning to burst forth. This is not a gentle spring, but seems more like a sprint start from cold, frost-dulled foliage and stems to a riot of vibrant green and flower buds in the Chestnuts which line some of the streets. I'm sure I will take many pictures as this gets going, but today I have a couple of things I wanted to share.

For some unknown reason, the modern parts of the pavements in some parts of the city are paved with cobbles which seem to have Labradorite inclusions in them. As I walk down the street, I can see these stunning flashes of blue amongst the grey stone blocks. When it rains, you can see them more. Can you imagine @ELIAKIM walking down these streets on a rainy day, the sun shining, and a rainbow overhead, and rainbows under your feet? I thought you might enjoy that image. Here's a picture I took on a rainy yet dull day - you can just see some flashes of blue, but the camera doesn't do it justice. Honestly though, it's hard enough being a foreigner in any city without being the weirdo photographing the pavement! Lol. I will try though, because it's really special.

[Image: labradorite-paving.jpg]





Now yesterday on my wanderings I came across this little arcade. I stepped inside just to be nosy, and oh my! How beautiful is this??? @Sassy I think you might enjoy seeing this. You can walk through to the corner, and then turn and walk out to the other street. It is gorgeous and full of special little shops. There's one there which seems to sell nothing but paintings and amber items. I must go back and look again.

[Image: IMAG0649.jpg]

[Image: IMAG0650.jpg]
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#24
We still have cobbled stones in the ancient Roman town where I live. Although I don't know how much longer I shall be staying, looks possible that I shall move more rural. 

The architecture looks great like many that can be found in many European cities. 

Odessa does have some geopathic stress due to past events and that can cause an energetic vortex. 

The Odessa massacre was the mass murder of the Jewish population of Odessa and surrounding towns in the Transnistria Governorate during the autumn of 1941 and the winter of 1942 while it was under Romanian control.

Depending on the accepted terms of reference and scope, the Odessa massacre refers either to the events of October 22–24, 1941 in which some 25,000 to 34,000 Jews were shot or burned, or to the murder of well over 100,000 Ukrainian Jews in the town and the areas between the Dniester and Bug rivers, during the Romanian and German occupation. The primary perpetrators were Romanian soldiers, Einsatzgruppe SS and local ethnic Germans.[1][2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1941_Odessa_massacre[Image: 300px-WW2-Holocaust-Ukraine.png]

In the UK we do have some geopathic stress due to the Industrial Revolution, and due to the bombs, and planes going down in WW2. 

Although a lot of spiritual people did a lot of work clearing our countries energetically in European countries during the 20th century. From what I remember they tended to work mostly in rural areas. 

Odessa or Odesa (Ukrainian: Оде́са, romanizedOdesa [oˈdɛsɐ] ([Image: 11px-Loudspeaker.svg.png]listen)Russian: Оде́сса, romanizedOdessa [ɐˈdʲesə]Bulgarian: Оде́са, romanizedOdesa) is the third most populous city of Ukraine and a major tourism center, seaport and transport hub located on the northwestern shore of the Black Sea. It is also the administrative center of the Odessa Raion and Odessa Oblast, as well a multiethnic cultural center. Odessa is sometimes called the "pearl of the Black Sea",[3] the "South Capital" (under the Russian Empire and Soviet Union), and "Southern Palmyra".

Before the Tsarist establishment of Odessa, an ancient Greek settlement existed at its location. A more recent Tatar settlement was also founded at the location by Hacı I Giray, the Khan of Crimea in 1440 that was named after him as Hacibey (or Khadjibey).[4] After a period of Lithuanian Grand Duchy control, Hacibey and surroundings became part of the domain of the Ottomans in 1529 and remained there until the empire's defeat in the Russo-Turkish War of 1792.

In 1794, the city of Odessa was founded by a decree of the Russian empress Catherine the Great. From 1819 to 1858, Odessa was a free port—a porto-franco. During the Soviet period, it was the most important port of trade in the Soviet Union and a Soviet naval base. On 1 January 2000, the Quarantine Pier at Odessa Commercial Sea Port was declared a free port and free economic zone for a period of 25 years.

During the 19th century, Odessa was the fourth largest city of Imperial Russia, after MoscowSaint Petersburg and Warsaw.[5] Its historical architecture has a style more Mediterranean than Russian, having been heavily influenced by French and Italian styles. Some buildings are built in a mixture of different styles, including Art NouveauRenaissance and Classicist.[6]


The city was named in compliance with the Greek Plan of Catherine the Great. It was named after the ancient Greek city of Odessos, which was mistakenly believed to have been located here. Odessa is located in between the ancient Greek cities of Tyras and Olbia, different from the ancient Odessos's location further west along the coast, which is at present day Varna, Bulgaria.[8]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odessa

You say that you would like to move to a more rural part of Ukraine @Rose one of the new Millennium messages received from the LORD "Stay away from the coastlines as they will be taken by the sea". 

Best wishes to you in your choice of home. 
Some people embraced big pharma to change nature whereas I listened to Jesus and embraced nature to improve the change. The heavenly Father said, "This is my daughter in whom I am well pleased". 18.1.2020. 
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#25
(04-29-2021, 11:14 AM)ELIAKIM Wrote: We still have cobbled stones in the ancient Roman town where I live. Although I don't know how much longer I shall be staying, looks possible that I shall move more rural. 

The architecture looks great like many that can be found in many European cities. 

Odessa does have some geopathic stress due to past events and that can cause an energetic vortex. 

The Odessa massacre was the mass murder of the Jewish population of Odessa and surrounding towns in the Transnistria Governorate during the autumn of 1941 and the winter of 1942 while it was under Romanian control.

Depending on the accepted terms of reference and scope, the Odessa massacre refers either to the events of October 22–24, 1941 in which some 25,000 to 34,000 Jews were shot or burned, or to the murder of well over 100,000 Ukrainian Jews in the town and the areas between the Dniester and Bug rivers, during the Romanian and German occupation. The primary perpetrators were Romanian soldiers, Einsatzgruppe SS and local ethnic Germans.[1][2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1941_Odessa_massacre[Image: 300px-WW2-Holocaust-Ukraine.png]

In the UK we do have some geopathic stress due to the Industrial Revolution, and due to the bombs, and planes going down in WW2. 

Although a lot of spiritual people did a lot of work clearing our countries energetically in European countries during the 20th century. From what I remember they tended to work mostly in rural areas. 

Odessa or Odesa (Ukrainian: Оде́са, romanizedOdesa [oˈdɛsɐ] ([Image: 11px-Loudspeaker.svg.png]listen)Russian: Оде́сса, romanizedOdessa [ɐˈdʲesə]Bulgarian: Оде́са, romanizedOdesa) is the third most populous city of Ukraine and a major tourism center, seaport and transport hub located on the northwestern shore of the Black Sea. It is also the administrative center of the Odessa Raion and Odessa Oblast, as well a multiethnic cultural center. Odessa is sometimes called the "pearl of the Black Sea",[3] the "South Capital" (under the Russian Empire and Soviet Union), and "Southern Palmyra".

Before the Tsarist establishment of Odessa, an ancient Greek settlement existed at its location. A more recent Tatar settlement was also founded at the location by Hacı I Giray, the Khan of Crimea in 1440 that was named after him as Hacibey (or Khadjibey).[4] After a period of Lithuanian Grand Duchy control, Hacibey and surroundings became part of the domain of the Ottomans in 1529 and remained there until the empire's defeat in the Russo-Turkish War of 1792.

In 1794, the city of Odessa was founded by a decree of the Russian empress Catherine the Great. From 1819 to 1858, Odessa was a free port—a porto-franco. During the Soviet period, it was the most important port of trade in the Soviet Union and a Soviet naval base. On 1 January 2000, the Quarantine Pier at Odessa Commercial Sea Port was declared a free port and free economic zone for a period of 25 years.

During the 19th century, Odessa was the fourth largest city of Imperial Russia, after MoscowSaint Petersburg and Warsaw.[5] Its historical architecture has a style more Mediterranean than Russian, having been heavily influenced by French and Italian styles. Some buildings are built in a mixture of different styles, including Art NouveauRenaissance and Classicist.[6]


The city was named in compliance with the Greek Plan of Catherine the Great. It was named after the ancient Greek city of Odessos, which was mistakenly believed to have been located here. Odessa is located in between the ancient Greek cities of Tyras and Olbia, different from the ancient Odessos's location further west along the coast, which is at present day Varna, Bulgaria.[8]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odessa

You say that you would like to move to a more rural part of Ukraine @Rose one of the new Millennium messages received from the LORD "Stay away from the coastlines as they will be taken by the sea". 

Best wishes to you in your choice of home. 
They won't be taken by the sea here in Odesa - we are dozens of feet above sea level. It's a hugely long walk down down down to the beach. Get fit coming back up though! Steps everywhere.
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#26
@Rose


It has flooded before and it can happen again. 

Recent oceanographic research efforts using a pair of underwater remote operated vehicles (ROVs) has ventured below the Black Sea waters and revealed pieces of ancient history never before seen in such vivid resolution. These submarine missions have discovered ships from several millennia of seafaring trade and war, including the world’s oldest intact shipwreck: a Greek trading ship from around 400BC lying uncannily well-preserved on the seabed. 


And among the wrecks, new evidence offers clues from more than 7,000 years ago, when some experts believe the Black Sea was just a small freshwater lake. Geological samples drilled from the seabed could, at last, settle the mystery of whether it was here that waters once rushed in, flattening civilisations and leaving behind the story we know as Noah and the great biblical flood.

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20191021...cked-ships
Some people embraced big pharma to change nature whereas I listened to Jesus and embraced nature to improve the change. The heavenly Father said, "This is my daughter in whom I am well pleased". 18.1.2020. 
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#27
(04-29-2021, 12:21 PM)ELIAKIM Wrote: @Rose


It has flooded before and it can happen again. 

Recent oceanographic research efforts using a pair of underwater remote operated vehicles (ROVs) has ventured below the Black Sea waters and revealed pieces of ancient history never before seen in such vivid resolution. These submarine missions have discovered ships from several millennia of seafaring trade and war, including the world’s oldest intact shipwreck: a Greek trading ship from around 400BC lying uncannily well-preserved on the seabed. 


And among the wrecks, new evidence offers clues from more than 7,000 years ago, when some experts believe the Black Sea was just a small freshwater lake. Geological samples drilled from the seabed could, at last, settle the mystery of whether it was here that waters once rushed in, flattening civilisations and leaving behind the story we know as Noah and the great biblical flood.

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20191021...cked-ships
I'm sure you're just trying to help, but really, I am here, if Odesa flooded, then everywhere else would be in big trouble. We are around 50 metres above sea level!

https://www.floodmap.net/Elevation/Eleva...?gi=698740
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#28
Did you hear the sound of this @Rose 
Some people embraced big pharma to change nature whereas I listened to Jesus and embraced nature to improve the change. The heavenly Father said, "This is my daughter in whom I am well pleased". 18.1.2020. 
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#29
(04-30-2021, 10:52 AM)ELIAKIM Wrote: Did you hear the sound of this @Rose 
No, it may well have been the other side of Crimea.
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#30
(04-30-2021, 10:59 AM)Rose Wrote:
(04-30-2021, 10:52 AM)ELIAKIM Wrote: Did you hear the sound of this @Rose 
No, it may well have been the other side of Crimea.
Video says black sea. I must admit I haven't looked at the map.
Some people embraced big pharma to change nature whereas I listened to Jesus and embraced nature to improve the change. The heavenly Father said, "This is my daughter in whom I am well pleased". 18.1.2020. 
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