Prepper recipes...?
#1
I have a crapload of rice, beans, pasta, legumes, canned veggies, fish, & meat.

Anyone have recipes they want to share?
Fauci sucks
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#2
(07-14-2021, 01:14 PM)Shore_Skeptic Wrote: I have a crapload of rice, beans, pasta, legumes, canned veggies, fish, & meat.

Anyone have recipes they want to share?
They all go together quite well.
One point:
I never make plain, white rice.  I always cook it with a lot of curry powder, no matter what the recipe.
IMO, lentils are the most nutritious per serving of all the legumes.
My mind, a field of battles, struggles for peace in a tight place.
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#3
One of my all time favorites is the venerable Boy Scout dinner.

In a layer of aluminum foil place a 1/3 pound hamburger patty, cut up onion, carrots, celery and some potatoes cut up.

Put another layer of foil on top and crimp the edges so it will not leak while cooking.

Put in an oven at 300 degrees for an hour and a half.

When you open it, watch out for steam, it will be hot.

Or if outdoors, double up on the foil and put them on the hot coals from a camp fire.  Flip them over half way through.

Bon Apetit'
“It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so.”

― Mark Twain
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#4
One thing that people often overlook is the importance of storing up spices. A few key spices can help dress up the most basic of meals and add flavor to what might otherwise be a depressing meal, especially after eating the same things for a week. Consider turmeric, cayenne, paprika and garlic, among others. Spices don't take up much space, but they can definitely add tasty sparkle and, in addition, there are health benefits to many spices.
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#5
(07-14-2021, 01:14 PM)Shore_Skeptic Wrote: I have a crapload of rice, beans, pasta, legumes, canned veggies, fish, & meat.

Anyone have recipes they want to share?

As mentioned, spices are good. Easy to grow at home and dry by hanging upside down in a cool dry place then put in mason jars. BUT to your question, depends on what you are hungry for. When at home, I make two big meals a week and then make seperate different style meals with the leftovers. But with camping, I dont have that luxuary of fridge/freezer. So portion control is imporant. Once you open a can of veggies or fish, or whatever, you gotta use it within a couple of days at best (if you have ice and a cooler)

Beans and rice just go together. With some heat. Dried hot peppers, crushed...some salt and cumin and/or crushed corriander (cilantro seeds).

Meh, here is a good recipe:
https://www.freshoffthegrid.com/dutch-ov...eans-rice/[Image: XNRZWEL.jpg]
“Why don’t you start speaking in words instead of your DAMN DIRTY LIES!” – Louise Belcher
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#6
(07-14-2021, 06:57 PM)FritzyRitz Wrote: One thing that people often overlook is the importance of storing up spices. A few key spices can help dress up the most basic of meals and add flavor to what might otherwise be a depressing meal, especially after eating the same things for a week. Consider turmeric, cayenne, paprika and garlic, among others. Spices don't take up much space, but they can definitely add tasty sparkle and, in addition, there are health benefits to many spices.

To this point I feel like it should be pointed out that one of the more important yet overlooked spices is salt. It'll be good as gold when shtf
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#7
Personally I prefer to have some rice and  beans with chili or taco seasoning, but I'm lady doesn't like beans so I've be procuring powdered broccoli cheddar soup mix and fixing that with rice and some canned chicken or ham to make a pretty decent and palpable meal that we both would enjoy.

Canned peas , powdered egg, soy sauce, toasted sesame oil, peanut or vegetable oil, dried minced onion, garlic powder ,red pepper flakes, curry powder and Oriental all spice will make you a good fried rice with whatever meat and rice you have on hand. 

Curried lentils are awesome with rice too.

If you ever come across it bristol farms canned ham is awesome and cheaper than dax
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#8
(07-14-2021, 06:57 PM)FritzyRitz Wrote: One thing that people often overlook is the importance of storing up spices. A few key spices can help dress up the most basic of meals and add flavor to what might otherwise be a depressing meal, especially after eating the same things for a week. Consider turmeric, cayenne, paprika and garlic, among others. Spices don't take up much space, but they can definitely add tasty sparkle and, in addition, there are health benefits to many spices.
That's what I'm talking about! I'm eager to hear what spices people use and how...especially with lentils and barley.
Fauci sucks
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#9
(07-14-2021, 01:14 PM)Shore_Skeptic Wrote: I have a crapload of rice, beans, pasta, legumes, canned veggies, fish, & meat.

Anyone have recipes they want to share?

Cut the top off a beer can, when ya finish with it of course. And two more... When ya finish them.

Fill two of the cans with water.

Dig a pit, start a fire in it. start another fire a ways away from it. start a third near a good place to sit.

Once you have a good thick bed of coals in the pit, skin the last communist puke that you shot that day. if you dont have one handy, hurry up and bag one before the coals die down very much. Its not hard, they have become the most prolific animal in the nation today. Try to bag one of the blue haired ones.. they are the fattest and therefore tastiest.

After lining the pit, chop the communists liver up. It adds a most delicate "Lilly" flavor to the dish, though being cowards, the liver WILL be small, its just for flavoring.

As these animals spend most of their day sitting on their asses in mommies house, the back-strap and rump are the largest, fattest and juiciest parts of the animal...Something between beaver tail and Boston butt from a pig... An animal they are closely related to. You will want to chop these parts up as well.

Add your your dried goods to the meat, drain its blood into the third beer can, and place all three cans in the bottom of the lined pit. Place the mix around the cans of water and blood and then wrap it all up in the rest of the hide taken from the animal.

Place the coals from the second fire on top and then bury the whole thing with the earth you took from digging the pit.

Then pray, thanking God that while the communists have robbed the rest of the world of meat, you will be eating well

As the meal cooks, pop another beer around the third fire and go through and divide up any of the gear it may have stolen from decent, hard working Americans, while being sure to discard any of the cheap Chinese "tacticool" garbage it used mommies credit card to buy off of Amazon and Wish.

Set around with your buddies and talk about how cool it was in America before the communist coup. Bout the time youre on your tenth beer, the meal should be done. Dig it up, open the skin and enjoy... Afterwards go to bed with a full belly, and a smile on your face, knowing you have helped to eradicate one of the most invasive species to land on this continent... Drift off and dream about TOMORROWS hunt...  Pleasant dreams!!!


Chuckle
If you rotten sons of bitches are intent on starting a civil war, in my beloved Old Dominion, then at least do it right.Send bachelors... Bring body bags!

You know, There is a level that things are really stupid. Past that, you reach into the truely insane. After that, you reach the pathological. At SOME point we have to quit trying, and just admit to ourselves that these mother fuckers really ARE, TRUELY, evil.

SIC SEMPER TYRANNIS!!!
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#10
(07-15-2021, 06:19 PM)Shore_Skeptic Wrote:
(07-14-2021, 06:57 PM)FritzyRitz Wrote: One thing that people often overlook is the importance of storing up spices. A few key spices can help dress up the most basic of meals and add flavor to what might otherwise be a depressing meal, especially after eating the same things for a week. Consider turmeric, cayenne, paprika and garlic, among others. Spices don't take up much space, but they can definitely add tasty sparkle and, in addition, there are health benefits to many spices.
That's what I'm talking about! I'm eager to hear what spices people use and how...especially with lentils and barley.

No brag here as container herb planting is something that is really pretty easy. Most herbs are hearty and pest resistant. Highly suggested.
I grow my own peppers, sage, cilantro, basil, rosemary (you have to bring that inside in the winter) and thyme. The sage always overwinters and comes back strong. Have only had to buy 2 rosemary plants over the past 7 years as it will stay good to go for years if you bring it inside in the winter. Everything else will seed and can replant in the spring. Oh, and mint. That will grow like a weed. Again, I bring that inside too, as I like mint iced tea year round, but it will usually come back in the spring if you plant it in the ground and water it during the summer.
Barley and beef stew is my favorite camp stew. I use rosemary, sage, salt, black pepper, and ground coriander seeds.
Again, everything but the salt and pepper you can grow yourself. OH and garlic. I planted Elephant garlic about 10 years ago from 4 cloves and have a crap ton of it now. It is easy to grow and kicks off babies underground that are ready to harvest every other year. You know it is ready to dig if it blooms out. (the blooms are fantastic to use in cooking too) You DO have to hang it up to cure for about 2 weeks to get the real good garlic taste you want.
Lentils? Good question as I am just discovering those myself. I would take some good ideas with those as well.
“Why don’t you start speaking in words instead of your DAMN DIRTY LIES!” – Louise Belcher
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