Mystery of family found deceased in Sierra Nat’l Forest
#21
https://www.sfchronicle.com/california/a...426022.php

Feds close trails near mysterious Mariposa County family death for 'unknown hazards'
Matthias Gafni Aug. 31, 2021 Updated: Aug. 31, 2021 7:24 p.m. Facebook Twitter Email Comments

Sierra National Forest officials closed a portion of trails in Mariposa County where a family and their dog were found dead under mysterious circumstances in mid-August, citing unspecified safety concerns.

The monthlong closure is to “provide for public safety due to unknown hazards found in and near the Savage Lundy Trail,” according to the order. The closure will last until Sept. 26, although rangers can reopen the trails if conditions change.

Officials have not ruled out water toxicity as a contributing factor in the family’s death as they await the results of water tests taken from the area where the family was found.

“We are uncertain of the causes of death. We still haven’t gotten the results from the case,” said Leak Pen, assistant recreation officer at the Bass Lake Ranger District, which oversees that portion of the Sierra National Forest. “So, as a precaution, let’s go ahead and close it because we know there’s some form of hazard to the public.”

The closure affects nine trails, six picnic sites and the dirt Forest Road that leads to the Hites Cove trailhead. The 8.5-mile loop between Hites Cove and Savage Lundy trails is steep and challenging and mostly popular during the cooler spring months, Pen said.

The district took two weeks to close the trail to figure out the logistics of shuttering such a large area and when they realized answers for the deaths were still far off, Pen said.

Jonathan Gerrish, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old baby Aurelia Miju Chung-Gerrish and their dog Oski were found dead Aug. 17 about 1.5 miles below their truck, which was parked at the Hites Cove trailhead. There were no obvious signs of death, which led the Mariposa County Sheriff’s Office to initially close the area and deem it a hazardous materials scene.

Toxicology reports are still pending, leading investigators to wait to list a cause of death, but last week they ruled out any weapons being used or dangerous gases from a mine along the trail. The FBI is trying to access Gerrish’s cell phone, which was found in his pocket. State water officials and private labs are also testing water samples from the south fork of the Merced River and creeks along the trail, as well as a small amount of water from the couple’s water bladder backpack.

Temperatures reached 109 degrees the day they hiked, investigators have said.
[Image: 1200x0.jpg][color=rgba(79, 50, 28, 0.9)]A photo of Ellen Chung, left, and Jonathan Gerrish, holding their 1-year old daughter, Miju. All were found dead on a hiking trail in Mariposa. The cause of death has not yet been determined.Courtesy Steve Jeffe[/color]

Pen said one water test has come back positive for harmful algae bloom. Others have turned up no toxic substances and still other tests are outstanding. Officials had already warned hikers of such blooms a month before the deaths along the south fork of the Merced River, so that result is not a surprise. Such freshwater blooms are not known to kill humans.

“Because of the heat there’s a chance they may have drank the water or tried to treat the water, but we don’t know,” Pen said. “It’s very mysterious, and we’re all just waiting for the results.”

The Sierra National Forest closure coincides with a statewide shutdown of all national forestlands through Labor Day due to dangerous fire conditions and taxed firefighting crews. All 20 million acres of the state’s national forests will be closed to the public effective at midnight Tuesday.

“We do not take this decision lightly, but this is the best choice for public safety,” said Regional Forester Jennifer Eberlien.

The Forest Service had already closed nine of its national forests in Northern California on Aug. 22 for fire precautions.

Matthias Gafni is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: matthias.gafni@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @mgafni
That’s My King! —Dr. S.M. Lockridge, Official https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzqTFNfeDnE
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#22
(09-01-2021, 04:04 AM)Verity Wrote: https://www.sfchronicle.com/california/a...426022.php

Feds close trails near mysterious Mariposa County family death for 'unknown hazards'
Matthias Gafni Aug. 31, 2021 Updated: Aug. 31, 2021 7:24 p.m. Facebook Twitter Email Comments

Sierra National Forest officials closed a portion of trails in Mariposa County where a family and their dog were found dead under mysterious circumstances in mid-August, citing unspecified safety concerns.

The monthlong closure is to “provide for public safety due to unknown hazards found in and near the Savage Lundy Trail,” according to the order. The closure will last until Sept. 26, although rangers can reopen the trails if conditions change.

Officials have not ruled out water toxicity as a contributing factor in the family’s death as they await the results of water tests taken from the area where the family was found.

“We are uncertain of the causes of death. We still haven’t gotten the results from the case,” said Leak Pen, assistant recreation officer at the Bass Lake Ranger District, which oversees that portion of the Sierra National Forest. “So, as a precaution, let’s go ahead and close it because we know there’s some form of hazard to the public.”

The closure affects nine trails, six picnic sites and the dirt Forest Road that leads to the Hites Cove trailhead. The 8.5-mile loop between Hites Cove and Savage Lundy trails is steep and challenging and mostly popular during the cooler spring months, Pen said.

The district took two weeks to close the trail to figure out the logistics of shuttering such a large area and when they realized answers for the deaths were still far off, Pen said.

Jonathan Gerrish, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old baby Aurelia Miju Chung-Gerrish and their dog Oski were found dead Aug. 17 about 1.5 miles below their truck, which was parked at the Hites Cove trailhead. There were no obvious signs of death, which led the Mariposa County Sheriff’s Office to initially close the area and deem it a hazardous materials scene.

Toxicology reports are still pending, leading investigators to wait to list a cause of death, but last week they ruled out any weapons being used or dangerous gases from a mine along the trail. The FBI is trying to access Gerrish’s cell phone, which was found in his pocket. State water officials and private labs are also testing water samples from the south fork of the Merced River and creeks along the trail, as well as a small amount of water from the couple’s water bladder backpack.

Temperatures reached 109 degrees the day they hiked, investigators have said.
[Image: 1200x0.jpg][color=rgba(79, 50, 28, 0.9)]A photo of Ellen Chung, left, and Jonathan Gerrish, holding their 1-year old daughter, Miju. All were found dead on a hiking trail in Mariposa. The cause of death has not yet been determined.Courtesy Steve Jeffe[/color]

Pen said one water test has come back positive for harmful algae bloom. Others have turned up no toxic substances and still other tests are outstanding. Officials had already warned hikers of such blooms a month before the deaths along the south fork of the Merced River, so that result is not a surprise. Such freshwater blooms are not known to kill humans.

“Because of the heat there’s a chance they may have drank the water or tried to treat the water, but we don’t know,” Pen said. “It’s very mysterious, and we’re all just waiting for the results.”

The Sierra National Forest closure coincides with a statewide shutdown of all national forestlands through Labor Day due to dangerous fire conditions and taxed firefighting crews. All 20 million acres of the state’s national forests will be closed to the public effective at midnight Tuesday.

“We do not take this decision lightly, but this is the best choice for public safety,” said Regional Forester Jennifer Eberlien.

The Forest Service had already closed nine of its national forests in Northern California on Aug. 22 for fire precautions.

Matthias Gafni is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: matthias.gafni@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @mgafni
They must have been nuts to take a baby, a dog and themselves out into that heat hiking.
Some people embraced big pharma to change nature whereas I listened to Jesus and embraced nature to improve the change. The heavenly Father said, "This is my daughter in whom I am well pleased". 18.1.2020. 
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#23
(09-01-2021, 05:08 AM)ELIAKIM Wrote:
(09-01-2021, 04:04 AM)Verity Wrote: https://www.sfchronicle.com/california/a...426022.php

Feds close trails near mysterious Mariposa County family death for 'unknown hazards'
Matthias Gafni Aug. 31, 2021 Updated: Aug. 31, 2021 7:24 p.m. Facebook Twitter Email Comments

Sierra National Forest officials closed a portion of trails in Mariposa County where a family and their dog were found dead under mysterious circumstances in mid-August, citing unspecified safety concerns.

The monthlong closure is to “provide for public safety due to unknown hazards found in and near the Savage Lundy Trail,” according to the order. The closure will last until Sept. 26, although rangers can reopen the trails if conditions change.

Officials have not ruled out water toxicity as a contributing factor in the family’s death as they await the results of water tests taken from the area where the family was found.

“We are uncertain of the causes of death. We still haven’t gotten the results from the case,” said Leak Pen, assistant recreation officer at the Bass Lake Ranger District, which oversees that portion of the Sierra National Forest. “So, as a precaution, let’s go ahead and close it because we know there’s some form of hazard to the public.”

The closure affects nine trails, six picnic sites and the dirt Forest Road that leads to the Hites Cove trailhead. The 8.5-mile loop between Hites Cove and Savage Lundy trails is steep and challenging and mostly popular during the cooler spring months, Pen said.

The district took two weeks to close the trail to figure out the logistics of shuttering such a large area and when they realized answers for the deaths were still far off, Pen said.

Jonathan Gerrish, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old baby Aurelia Miju Chung-Gerrish and their dog Oski were found dead Aug. 17 about 1.5 miles below their truck, which was parked at the Hites Cove trailhead. There were no obvious signs of death, which led the Mariposa County Sheriff’s Office to initially close the area and deem it a hazardous materials scene.

Toxicology reports are still pending, leading investigators to wait to list a cause of death, but last week they ruled out any weapons being used or dangerous gases from a mine along the trail. The FBI is trying to access Gerrish’s cell phone, which was found in his pocket. State water officials and private labs are also testing water samples from the south fork of the Merced River and creeks along the trail, as well as a small amount of water from the couple’s water bladder backpack.

Temperatures reached 109 degrees the day they hiked, investigators have said.
[Image: 1200x0.jpg][color=rgba(79, 50, 28, 0.9)]A photo of Ellen Chung, left, and Jonathan Gerrish, holding their 1-year old daughter, Miju. All were found dead on a hiking trail in Mariposa. The cause of death has not yet been determined.Courtesy Steve Jeffe[/color]

Pen said one water test has come back positive for harmful algae bloom. Others have turned up no toxic substances and still other tests are outstanding. Officials had already warned hikers of such blooms a month before the deaths along the south fork of the Merced River, so that result is not a surprise. Such freshwater blooms are not known to kill humans.

“Because of the heat there’s a chance they may have drank the water or tried to treat the water, but we don’t know,” Pen said. “It’s very mysterious, and we’re all just waiting for the results.”

The Sierra National Forest closure coincides with a statewide shutdown of all national forestlands through Labor Day due to dangerous fire conditions and taxed firefighting crews. All 20 million acres of the state’s national forests will be closed to the public effective at midnight Tuesday.

“We do not take this decision lightly, but this is the best choice for public safety,” said Regional Forester Jennifer Eberlien.

The Forest Service had already closed nine of its national forests in Northern California on Aug. 22 for fire precautions.

Matthias Gafni is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: matthias.gafni@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @mgafni
They must have been nuts to take a baby, a dog and themselves out into that heat hiking.
I don’t know, @ELIAKIM. Yes it was hot but not unheard of for this time of year. Probably a Brit wouldn’t be able to tolerate such temps but most Californians would, if perhaps a little worse for the wear but not to the point of death. Also it is very dry in CA. I believe humid heat can kill more easily—you literally cannot breathe. 

I don’t think heat is what did them in. I am leaning more towards one of the adults being responsible. I was reading earlier that Ellen had a TBI 20 years ago. Maybe she had PPD. Who knows. It just doesn’t add up that this was in any way a natural occurrence. Nobody can offer any similar instance historically. Occam’s Razor.  1dunno1
That’s My King! —Dr. S.M. Lockridge, Official https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzqTFNfeDnE
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#24
Quote:Pen said one water test has come back positive for harmful algae bloom. Others have turned up no toxic substances and still other tests are outstanding. Officials had already warned hikers of such blooms a month before the deaths along the south fork of the Merced River, so that result is not a surprise. Such freshwater blooms are not known to kill humans.

“Because of the heat there’s a chance they may have drank the water or tried to treat the water, but we don’t know,” Pen said. “It’s very mysterious, and we’re all just waiting for the results.”

They keep mentioning the water but, again, they had a camel bag that still had (presumably) fresh water in it. If it was tainted water with their personal supply, you would think that would have come out immediately. Plus there is the thing of freshwater algae rarely being LETAL to healthy adults. It can mess up your liver and will kill a dog or small child, but I don't think that blue/green algae blooms have ever been a sole cause of death in the U.S.


“Most of the harmful algal bloom reports that we received were related to cyanobacteria blooms, which people often call blue-green algae,” Roberts said.

That’s the algae often found in Southwest Florida.

The top symptoms include gastrointestinal distress, headaches, fever and lethargy.

'It helps us understand a little bit more the magnitude of the problem in terms of who’s getting sick, when they’re getting sick, where these events are occurring,” Roberts said.

The 18 reporting states reported 421 harmful algal blooms, leading to 389 cases of human illness, but not death were reported.

The same can’t be said for animals.

During that two-year period, algal blooms impacted 413 animals, killing 369 of them.'"

https://www.winknews.com/2021/06/01/cdc-...d-animals/

I DID read that, while looking up more info on the toxicity of the algae that was in the river, that they were JUST getting around to testing the water bag as of last week. Again, one would think that would be one of the first things tested after obvious signs of foul play were ruled out. Just so freaking weird.
“Why don’t you start speaking in words instead of your DAMN DIRTY LIES!” – Louise Belcher
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#25
(09-01-2021, 05:39 AM)Pure Rock Fury Wrote:
Quote:Pen said one water test has come back positive for harmful algae bloom. Others have turned up no toxic substances and still other tests are outstanding. Officials had already warned hikers of such blooms a month before the deaths along the south fork of the Merced River, so that result is not a surprise. Such freshwater blooms are not known to kill humans.

“Because of the heat there’s a chance they may have drank the water or tried to treat the water, but we don’t know,” Pen said. “It’s very mysterious, and we’re all just waiting for the results.”

They keep mentioning the water but, again, they had a camel bag that still had (presumably) fresh water in it.  If it was tainted water with their personal supply, you would think that would have come out immediately.  Plus there is the thing of freshwater algae rarely being LETAL to healthy adults.  It can mess up your liver and will kill a dog or small child, but I don't think that blue/green algae blooms have ever been a sole cause of death in the U.S. 


“Most of the harmful algal bloom reports that we received were related to cyanobacteria blooms, which people often call blue-green algae,” Roberts said.

That’s the algae often found in Southwest Florida.

The top symptoms include gastrointestinal distress, headaches, fever and lethargy.

'It helps us understand a little bit more the magnitude of the problem in terms of who’s getting sick, when they’re getting sick, where these events are occurring,” Roberts said.

The 18 reporting states reported 421 harmful algal blooms, leading to 389 cases of human illness, but not death were reported.

The same can’t be said for animals.

During that two-year period, algal blooms impacted 413 animals, killing 369 of them.'" 

https://www.winknews.com/2021/06/01/cdc-...d-animals/

I DID read that, while looking up more info on the toxicity of the algae that was in the river, that they were JUST getting around to testing the water bag as of last week.  Again, one would think that would be one of the first things tested after obvious signs of foul play were ruled out.  Just so freaking weird.
Good post, @Pure Rock Fury. I did not know the water bag had already been tested, so good to know. 

I’m close to Lake Temescal in Oakland which has had these blooms for years. Despite the warnings, dogs, kids and adults get into the water repeatedly. No humans have ever died as a result. 

I agree (as indicated in my post to @ELIAKIM) that it just doesn’t seem at all feasible that the trail/natural environment caused the demise of this family. 

Rather they had to have brought their own issues so to speak—including perhaps deadly poison/s—into this beautiful environment. :( I really do think in the end we will learn it was all about them (literally).
That’s My King! —Dr. S.M. Lockridge, Official https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzqTFNfeDnE
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#26
(09-01-2021, 05:13 AM)Verity Wrote:
(09-01-2021, 05:08 AM)ELIAKIM Wrote:
(09-01-2021, 04:04 AM)Verity Wrote: https://www.sfchronicle.com/california/a...426022.php

Feds close trails near mysterious Mariposa County family death for 'unknown hazards'
Matthias Gafni Aug. 31, 2021 Updated: Aug. 31, 2021 7:24 p.m. Facebook Twitter Email Comments

Sierra National Forest officials closed a portion of trails in Mariposa County where a family and their dog were found dead under mysterious circumstances in mid-August, citing unspecified safety concerns.

The monthlong closure is to “provide for public safety due to unknown hazards found in and near the Savage Lundy Trail,” according to the order. The closure will last until Sept. 26, although rangers can reopen the trails if conditions change.

Officials have not ruled out water toxicity as a contributing factor in the family’s death as they await the results of water tests taken from the area where the family was found.

“We are uncertain of the causes of death. We still haven’t gotten the results from the case,” said Leak Pen, assistant recreation officer at the Bass Lake Ranger District, which oversees that portion of the Sierra National Forest. “So, as a precaution, let’s go ahead and close it because we know there’s some form of hazard to the public.”

The closure affects nine trails, six picnic sites and the dirt Forest Road that leads to the Hites Cove trailhead. The 8.5-mile loop between Hites Cove and Savage Lundy trails is steep and challenging and mostly popular during the cooler spring months, Pen said.

The district took two weeks to close the trail to figure out the logistics of shuttering such a large area and when they realized answers for the deaths were still far off, Pen said.

Jonathan Gerrish, Ellen Chung, their 1-year-old baby Aurelia Miju Chung-Gerrish and their dog Oski were found dead Aug. 17 about 1.5 miles below their truck, which was parked at the Hites Cove trailhead. There were no obvious signs of death, which led the Mariposa County Sheriff’s Office to initially close the area and deem it a hazardous materials scene.

Toxicology reports are still pending, leading investigators to wait to list a cause of death, but last week they ruled out any weapons being used or dangerous gases from a mine along the trail. The FBI is trying to access Gerrish’s cell phone, which was found in his pocket. State water officials and private labs are also testing water samples from the south fork of the Merced River and creeks along the trail, as well as a small amount of water from the couple’s water bladder backpack.

Temperatures reached 109 degrees the day they hiked, investigators have said.
[Image: 1200x0.jpg][color=rgba(79, 50, 28, 0.9)]A photo of Ellen Chung, left, and Jonathan Gerrish, holding their 1-year old daughter, Miju. All were found dead on a hiking trail in Mariposa. The cause of death has not yet been determined.Courtesy Steve Jeffe[/color]

Pen said one water test has come back positive for harmful algae bloom. Others have turned up no toxic substances and still other tests are outstanding. Officials had already warned hikers of such blooms a month before the deaths along the south fork of the Merced River, so that result is not a surprise. Such freshwater blooms are not known to kill humans.

“Because of the heat there’s a chance they may have drank the water or tried to treat the water, but we don’t know,” Pen said. “It’s very mysterious, and we’re all just waiting for the results.”

The Sierra National Forest closure coincides with a statewide shutdown of all national forestlands through Labor Day due to dangerous fire conditions and taxed firefighting crews. All 20 million acres of the state’s national forests will be closed to the public effective at midnight Tuesday.

“We do not take this decision lightly, but this is the best choice for public safety,” said Regional Forester Jennifer Eberlien.

The Forest Service had already closed nine of its national forests in Northern California on Aug. 22 for fire precautions.

Matthias Gafni is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: matthias.gafni@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @mgafni
They must have been nuts to take a baby, a dog and themselves out into that heat hiking.
I don’t know, @ELIAKIM. Yes it was hot but not unheard of for this time of year. Probably a Brit wouldn’t be able to tolerate such temps but most Californians would, if perhaps a little worse for the wear but not to the point of death. Also it is very dry in CA. I believe humid heat can kill more easily—you literally cannot breathe. 

I don’t think heat is what did them in. I am leaning more towards one of the adults being responsible. I was reading earlier that Ellen had a TBI 20 years ago. Maybe she had PPD. Who knows. It just doesn’t add up that this was in any way a natural occurrence. Nobody can offer any similar instance historically. Occam’s Razor.  1dunno1

What's a "TBI"?

Also, I wonder if it was Arsenic? Some places around us have a very high amount of it, and the water is not drinkable without intervention.
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#27
(08-28-2021, 11:41 AM)FlyoverCountry Wrote: The creepy thing is that a simple walk through the woods can lead to death of an entire family  Scream1

It's still probably safer than a walk in a downtown park or a drive on an interstate highway.
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#28
(09-02-2021, 10:48 AM)SouthernBelle Wrote:
(09-01-2021, 05:13 AM)Verity Wrote:
(09-01-2021, 05:08 AM)ELIAKIM Wrote: They must have been nuts to take a baby, a dog and themselves out into that heat hiking.
I don’t know, @ELIAKIM. Yes it was hot but not unheard of for this time of year. Probably a Brit wouldn’t be able to tolerate such temps but most Californians would, if perhaps a little worse for the wear but not to the point of death. Also it is very dry in CA. I believe humid heat can kill more easily—you literally cannot breathe. 

I don’t think heat is what did them in. I am leaning more towards one of the adults being responsible. I was reading earlier that Ellen had a TBI 20 years ago. Maybe she had PPD. Who knows. It just doesn’t add up that this was in any way a natural occurrence. Nobody can offer any similar instance historically. Occam’s Razor.  1dunno1

What's a "TBI"?

Also, I wonder if it was Arsenic?    Some places around us have a very high amount of it, and the water is not drinkable without intervention.
Traumatic Brain Injury. 

@Registeered also mentioned the possibility of arsenic (in spring water). Something I’d never heard of and know nothing about. I think it likely would have been mentioned as a possibility in this case by now i.e. by the investigating parties.
That’s My King! —Dr. S.M. Lockridge, Official https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzqTFNfeDnE
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#29
(09-02-2021, 10:53 AM)Verity Wrote:
(09-02-2021, 10:48 AM)SouthernBelle Wrote:
(09-01-2021, 05:13 AM)Verity Wrote: I don’t know, @ELIAKIM. Yes it was hot but not unheard of for this time of year. Probably a Brit wouldn’t be able to tolerate such temps but most Californians would, if perhaps a little worse for the wear but not to the point of death. Also it is very dry in CA. I believe humid heat can kill more easily—you literally cannot breathe. 

I don’t think heat is what did them in. I am leaning more towards one of the adults being responsible. I was reading earlier that Ellen had a TBI 20 years ago. Maybe she had PPD. Who knows. It just doesn’t add up that this was in any way a natural occurrence. Nobody can offer any similar instance historically. Occam’s Razor.  1dunno1

What's a "TBI"?

Also, I wonder if it was Arsenic?    Some places around us have a very high amount of it, and the water is not drinkable without intervention.
Traumatic Brain Injury. 

@Registeered also mentioned the possibility of arsenic (in spring water). Something I’d never heard of and know nothing about. I think it likely would have been mentioned as a possibility in this case by now i.e. by the investigating parties.

I know it exists in groundwater, I've obtained tests for various wells that had high concentrations from the groundwater. A spring is just a groundwater table that is under pressure from the soil and rock on top, it finds relief valves, i.e. springs.
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#30
(09-02-2021, 10:53 AM)Verity Wrote:
(09-02-2021, 10:48 AM)SouthernBelle Wrote:
(09-01-2021, 05:13 AM)Verity Wrote: I don’t know, @ELIAKIM. Yes it was hot but not unheard of for this time of year. Probably a Brit wouldn’t be able to tolerate such temps but most Californians would, if perhaps a little worse for the wear but not to the point of death. Also it is very dry in CA. I believe humid heat can kill more easily—you literally cannot breathe. 

I don’t think heat is what did them in. I am leaning more towards one of the adults being responsible. I was reading earlier that Ellen had a TBI 20 years ago. Maybe she had PPD. Who knows. It just doesn’t add up that this was in any way a natural occurrence. Nobody can offer any similar instance historically. Occam’s Razor.  1dunno1

What's a "TBI"?

Also, I wonder if it was Arsenic?    Some places around us have a very high amount of it, and the water is not drinkable without intervention.
Traumatic Brain Injury. 

@Registeered also mentioned the possibility of arsenic (in spring water). Something I’d never heard of and know nothing about. I think it likely would have been mentioned as a possibility in this case by now i.e. by the investigating parties.

I find it hard to believe that it is taking so long to test their water. We get complete results in under a week.

Scratchinghead
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