My Terra Cotta Heater (1st attempt)
#1
DANCENANNA 
I'm pretty bummed that my Jackery solar generator won't power the smallest of space heaters. I don't recall which thread, but there was a discussion about non-electric emergency heaters. I was intrigued by the terra cotta heater, so I decided to build one. The saucer is 8.5". The upper portion is a 4.5" pot inside a 6" pot connected by a 3/8-16 bolt, nuts, & washers. I used a bolt 2" in length, but a 4" is recommended.

Has anyone ever built one?

If so, does a three pot design generate more heat than two?

Does the length of the bolt affect the functionality?

Thanks in advance!

[Image: 1013211913.jpg]
Fauci sucks
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#2
(10-13-2021, 06:43 PM)Shore_Skeptic Wrote: I'm pretty bummed that my Jackery solar generator won't power the smallest of space heaters. I don't recall which thread, but there was a discussion about non-electric emergency heaters. I was intrigued by the terra cotta heater, so I decided to build one. The saucer is 8.5". The upper portion is a 4.5" pot inside a 6" pot connected by a 3/8-16 bolt, nuts, & washers. I used a bolt 2" in length, but a 4" is recommended.

Has anyone ever built one?

If so, does a three pot design generate more heat than two?

Does the length of the bolt affect the functionality?

Thanks in advance!

[Image: 1013211913.jpg]



I've built several over the years. What you have there is about as good as it gets. Heartflowers

Bolt length does not matter.
Adding a third pot might diminish, not add to the function. Drinks
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#3
Shore_Skeptic Wrote:I'm pretty bummed that my Jackery solar generator won't power the smallest of space heaters. I don't recall which thread, but there was a discussion about non-electric emergency heaters. I was intrigued by the terra cotta heater, so I decided to build one. The saucer is 8.5". The upper portion is a 4.5" pot inside a 6" pot connected by a 3/8-16 bolt, nuts, & washers. I used a bolt 2" in length, but a 4" is recommended.

Has anyone ever built one?

If so, does a three pot design generate more heat than two?

Does the length of the bolt affect the functionality?

Thanks in advance!

[Image: 1013211913.jpg]

I did build one - and almost set my table on fire!
They do work great for heat. But..... I had to refinish my work table.
Terracotta pot heater was one of my fail projects.

What I did wrong-

I had the pots/ candles set in a metal pan, but the pan was sitting on a wooden table. It got so hot the wood under the pan started smoking. The entire candlewax caught on fire.
Place your heater hanging in air, or on stone. Hanging presents other issues if you have to suddenly extinguish it, so consider carefully if the pot breaks or it overheats.

I used 5 tealights. It got too hot and the entire candle caught as a fuel source, not just the wick.
My second mistake was not having a pre-fitted lid ready to extinguish flames. It was a near thing and dangerous scramble to remove the hot clay pots to expose the flames to air, then try to smother with an iron pot lid that did not quite fit the holding pan.

So, my words of caution are stone supports, potholder gloves handy and fitted lid to extinguish, or co2 extinguisher nearby.


I had to refinish my table. Everytime I saw that scorch mark I felt like a dumbass.
Don't double dumbass.
Heartflowers
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#4
Space heaters are pure resistance electrically speaking.  There's nothing more inefficient. 

The reason the coils get hot is because voltage is trying to push current thru a metal that resists. 

Using Ohms law....
Volts x Amps = watts.  

Even further....
Volts x Amps x Power Factor = watts.
__________________________

 

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#5
(10-13-2021, 08:19 PM)FlyoverCountry Wrote: Space heaters are pure resistance electrically speaking.  There's nothing more inefficient. 

The reason the coils get hot is because voltage is trying to push current thru a metal that resists. 

Using Ohms law....
Volts x Amps = watts.  

Even further....
Volts x Amps x Power Factor = watts.
Now if I could only build a terracotta air conditioner/cooler. Chuckle
My mind, a field of battles, struggles for peace in a tight place.
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#6
Oldcynic Wrote:
FlyoverCountry Wrote:Space heaters are pure resistance electrically speaking.  There's nothing more inefficient. 

The reason the coils get hot is because voltage is trying to push current thru a metal that resists. 

Using Ohms law....
Volts x Amps = watts.  

Even further....
Volts x Amps x Power Factor = watts.
Now if I could only build a terracotta air conditioner/cooler. Chuckle

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FIHj5qDwycI
Heartflowers
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#7
(10-13-2021, 09:43 PM)Oldcynic Wrote:
(10-13-2021, 08:19 PM)FlyoverCountry Wrote: Space heaters are pure resistance electrically speaking.  There's nothing more inefficient. 

The reason the coils get hot is because voltage is trying to push current thru a metal that resists. 

Using Ohms law....
Volts x Amps = watts.  

Even further....
Volts x Amps x Power Factor = watts.
Now if I could only build a terracotta air conditioner/cooler. Chuckle
Is my whiskey getting in your way?

Chuckle
__________________________

 

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#8
I built one, just because. It was a nice experiment . I suppose that it would heat a small room like a bathroom.  In an emergency situation it could keep a person from freezing to death.
*
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#9
(10-13-2021, 08:07 PM)PickleSnout Wrote:
Shore_Skeptic Wrote:I'm pretty bummed that my Jackery solar generator won't power the smallest of space heaters. I don't recall which thread, but there was a discussion about non-electric emergency heaters. I was intrigued by the terra cotta heater, so I decided to build one. The saucer is 8.5". The upper portion is a 4.5" pot inside a 6" pot connected by a 3/8-16 bolt, nuts, & washers. I used a bolt 2" in length, but a 4" is recommended.

Has anyone ever built one?

If so, does a three pot design generate more heat than two?

Does the length of the bolt affect the functionality?

Thanks in advance!

[Image: 1013211913.jpg]

I did build one - and almost set my table on fire! 
They do work great for heat. But..... I had to refinish my work table.
Terracotta pot heater was one of my fail projects.

What I did wrong-

I had the pots/ candles set in a metal pan, but the pan was sitting on a wooden table.  It got so hot the wood under the pan started smoking. The entire candlewax caught on fire.
Place your heater hanging in air, or on stone. Hanging presents other issues if you have to suddenly extinguish it, so consider carefully if the pot breaks or it overheats.

I used 5 tealights. It got too hot and the entire candle caught as a fuel source, not just the wick.
My second mistake was not having a pre-fitted lid ready to extinguish flames. It was a near thing and dangerous scramble to remove the hot clay pots to expose the flames to air, then try to smother with an iron pot lid that did not quite fit the holding pan.

So, my words of caution are stone supports, potholder gloves handy and fitted lid to extinguish, or co2 extinguisher nearby.


I had to refinish my table. Everytime I saw that scorch mark I felt like a dumbass.
Don't double dumbass.
I did something similar - mine wasn't constructed as I didn't have the stuff to do it, I just used an old grille (which was a mini oven shelf) and put the pots over the top. It worked well, but really got too hot and did leave a mark on my table (mine was also in a metal pan). However, it really helped with heating in an old and cold house, so if I could have made a better one, it would have been helpful. 


Heartflowers
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#10
Thanks ...I rem these....looks good...
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