A question about a Symphony Orchestra
#11
(Yesterday, 09:51 PM)Godless_Patriot Wrote:
(Yesterday, 09:37 PM)Munchaab Wrote:
(Yesterday, 09:07 PM)Godless_Patriot Wrote: I must have watched this video half a dozen times. The performance of the orchestra is impeccable. Watch the conductor. That tiny little toothpick of a baton. He seems to lead more with body language and facial expression than anything else.
It's HD video. Watch on YT for a real visual experience.

[url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJVWEstu_lM][/url]

That was possibly one of the hardest pieces I ever conducted - easy to play - but the counterpoint and syncopation is hard to direct, esp with the dynamic changes...

This guy seems more how I do it - strict time conducted with right hand - triangle 3/4 time in this case - facial, head and body gestures for the rest - I was never holding a Viol in the other hand though...

Forgot the link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJC-_j3SnXk
Oh hell yeah! That looked like a shit ton o' fun! Laser lights! Fiery 'splosions! What more could you want from a symphony orchestra! Cheer

The only time I conducted lights and pyrotechnics too - was with the 1812 at a party in the park...

Something like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J8RE7Owx7CE
I do not know everything, I know just enough to know that I know nothing - which is just a little more than those who think they know anything!


[Image: xHV5PUW.png]
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#12
Great question.  The conductor is much of the time like a metronome.  You can take your eyes off of the conductor for a few seconds without problem.

By the time a musician in an orchestra is performing a selection publicly, they have performed it so many times that they have literally memorized most of the sheet music for that selection.

The conductor is there to provide consistency and regulate the pace.  The sheet music is there for reference.  All of the rest is sheer talent.
“It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so.”

― Mark Twain
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#13
I guess it was like in the Army with my Mortar Crews...
I would call out the data for the guns and they would read it back to me while I was getting adjustment data on the radio from the Forward Observer at the same time.
Sounds like it's confusing but it worked !
Gunpowder smoke behind the Dogwood trees
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#14
(Yesterday, 10:35 PM)phxsparks Wrote: Great question.  The conductor is much of the time like a metronome.  You can take your eyes off of the conductor for a few seconds without problem.

By the time a musician in an orchestra is performing a selection publicly, they have performed it so many times that they have literally memorized most of the sheet music for that selection.

The conductor is there to provide consistency and regulate the pace.  The sheet music is there for reference.  All of the rest is sheer talent.

This ^ ^.    Nod

PS:  I never played flute in professional orchestra, but I played in grade school and high school band.
Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in Heaven.  ~ Matthew 5:16 

Pray without ceasing.  Pray for our Constitutional Republic!  Pray for President Trump!  
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#15
Grendelmort Wrote:I understand what the Conductor does - he pretty much keeps everyone in "time" with each other.
How does an instrument player read music and watch the Conductor at the same time ?
If you are a musician worth a salt, you know the music inside and out already. You will have practiced the works countless hours alone to be certain you know it perfectly. You will also have many hours in the company of the orchestra to understand how to play together. Who is louder or softer, and how to blend yourself to the whole so it is not individual voices, but a seamless whole.

Now, after practicing with the orchestra, you will learn the conductors gestures and desires.
The music is there as a memory jog. You do look at it, but mostly you watch the conductor to see what they want.

2nd violinist, 3rd place california state medal for the 101 clock symphony. Woop woop!
I had hoped to be a musician one day, but then I found how crazy fast you had to know pieces to be a studio musician. I was never near that good, and did not want to spend my days practicing endlessly.

Now, I play for myself. Sounds like killing cats, but it makes me very happy. I miss playing with people, but I just put on recordings and play with the orchestras. Its good, and no pressure for perfection.

Ah yeah munchie! So right about rests. I also did percussion in band. All the weird stuff, bells, chimes, triangle, kettle drums, wood blocks, ect. You count. And just watch for when and how loud.
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#16
(Today, 12:54 AM)PickleSnout Wrote:
Grendelmort Wrote:I understand what the Conductor does - he pretty much keeps everyone in "time" with each other.
How does an instrument player read music and watch the Conductor at the same time ?
If you are a musician worth a salt, you know the music inside and out already. You will have practiced the works countless hours alone to be certain you know it perfectly. You will also have many hours in the company of the orchestra to understand how to play together. Who is louder or softer, and how to blend yourself to the whole so it is not individual voices, but a seamless whole.

Now, after practicing with the orchestra, you will learn the conductors gestures and desires.
The music is there as a memory jog. You do look at it, but mostly you watch the conductor to see what they want.

2nd violinist, 3rd place california state medal for the 101 clock symphony. Woop woop!
I had hoped to be a musician one day, but then I found how crazy fast you had to know pieces to be a studio musician. I was never near that good, and did not want to spend my days practicing endlessly.

Now, I play for myself. Sounds like killing cats, but it makes me very happy. I miss playing with people, but I just put on recordings and play with the orchestras. Its good, and no pressure for perfection.

Ah yeah munchie! So right about rests. I also did percussion in band. All the weird stuff, bells, chimes, triangle, kettle drums, wood blocks, ect. You count. And just watch for when and how loud.
I know what you mean. As far as "killing cats" my cats like my guitar playing and singing (I have 3, a 13yo, a 7yo and a 1yo) and all will sing with me.....
Gunpowder smoke behind the Dogwood trees
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