Extreme Cars....
#11
Hyper cars are the next generation and much to the dismay of us old petrol heads, they're going full electric. What I like about Rimac is that his decision to go electric was based on what he saw as the most efficient way to get power to the wheels and he is not on the high and mighty EV to save the planet bandwagon.

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#12
This is pretty extreme...

[Image: fQEXgv6.jpg]
If society fell apart, we - the people would build a new one. Most people are good at their core, and when we see things that are wrong we work to fix them together. Make friends with your neighbors, get involved with your community - because we will rebuild our lives, our communities, from horrible circumstances we always will.
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#13
Two . . . Thousand . . . Horse Power . . . . . ? ! ! ?

Scream1

Where 's The Dyno Read Out ?


.
[Image: 3FTRPrR.png][Image: on1tkoS.png]
https://web.archive.org/web/201310032204...gacy.info/
Celebrating Over 30 Years as a " Designated Paper Terrorist "
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#14
(02-08-2022, 06:33 PM)Oldcynic Wrote:
(02-08-2022, 05:58 PM)=42 Wrote:
(02-08-2022, 02:09 PM)Oldcynic Wrote: The Italian designers/coachbuilders were the finest.  Their organic, creature-like, almost provocative lines were the most beautiful shapes on four wheels. 

The original British E-Type Jaguar was the exception.  Even Enzo Ferrari said it was the most beautiful car in the world.

Design geniuses such as Bertone, Superleggera, Pininfarina, Scaglietti, Ghia and others, created designs that were timeless and sexy.

Marcello Gandini penned most of the beloved classic Lamborghinis.  His designs were probably the most imitated and influential.

IMO, you can say there are 4 major "food" groups of performance cars, each with their own general strengths comparatively. Of course there are specific examples like the E type Jag that defy the generalities. Here's how I break it down in no particular order.

German - Chasis, powertrain & handling.
Brittish - Luxury, exquisite interiors, fit & finish.
Italian - Coach design, stunning good looks. Amazing exhaust notes.
American - Brute power, straight line speed.


I agree with your categorization 100%.
European cars were part of my life since the early 50s.  Fascinated and impressed, they were my profession for 50 years.

There can also be a mechanical architecture comparison.

Each nation seems to have had a signature method of engineering systems.  Not so much with contemporary "computer cars."

The Germans and the Swedes had an "owner friendly" layout so the weekend tinkerer could easily perform minor maintenance.

Seems each street car or race car from Europe reflected its origins in an obvious, artistic way.

My dad had an auto parts store (Beck/Arnley) exclusively for foreign cars which I literally grew up in (the 70's & 80's).

Easy to work on; Volkswagen - yes, Volvo - yes, SAAB - hell no! factory tools required even for the basic stuff.

I have to give the nod to American cars for ease of working on.

I remember "learning" to rebuild (American 2 barrel & 4 barrel) carburetors in high school auto shop class. I was dumbfounded how simple they were after having previously rebuilding several for foreign cars like Hondas!
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#15
I was born fifty years too soon.  Facepalm
Doin' what I can with what I got

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#16
(02-08-2022, 07:02 PM)Heir Wrote: Two . . . Thousand . . . Horse Power . . . . . ? ! ! ?

Scream1

Where 's The Dyno Read Out ?


.

I could not find dyno info and it looks like the official rating is 1900 hp & change. I'm giving it the benefit of the doubt considering that electric motors are predictably and reliably rated and this example is driven by 1 motor at each wheel so, no (or very minimal) drivetrain loss.
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#17
(02-08-2022, 07:25 PM)=42 Wrote:
(02-08-2022, 06:33 PM)Oldcynic Wrote:
(02-08-2022, 05:58 PM)=42 Wrote: IMO, you can say there are 4 major "food" groups of performance cars, each with their own general strengths comparatively. Of course there are specific examples like the E type Jag that defy the generalities. Here's how I break it down in no particular order.

German - Chasis, powertrain & handling.
Brittish - Luxury, exquisite interiors, fit & finish.
Italian - Coach design, stunning good looks. Amazing exhaust notes.
American - Brute power, straight line speed.


I agree with your categorization 100%.
European cars were part of my life since the early 50s.  Fascinated and impressed, they were my profession for 50 years.

There can also be a mechanical architecture comparison.

Each nation seems to have had a signature method of engineering systems.  Not so much with contemporary "computer cars."

The Germans and the Swedes had an "owner friendly" layout so the weekend tinkerer could easily perform minor maintenance.

Seems each street car or race car from Europe reflected its origins in an obvious, artistic way.

My dad had an auto parts store (Beck/Arnley) exclusively for foreign cars which I literally grew up in (the 70's & 80's).

Easy to work on; Volkswagen - yes, Volvo - yes, SAAB - hell no! factory tools required even for the basic stuff.

I have to give the nod to American cars for ease of working on.

I remember "learning" to rebuild (American 2 barrel & 4 barrel) carburetors in high school auto shop class. I was dumbfounded how simple they were after having previously rebuilding several for foreign cars like Hondas!
I recall many trips to Import Auto Parts which was a Beck/Arnley dealer.  In those days guys would open indy shops and be a haven for "them foreign cars."
The parking lot sign would read "YOUR IMPORT ISN'T FOREIGN TO US"
My mind, a field of battles, struggles for peace in a tight place.
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#18
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pN9jYw8qm2o

Here we celebrate one of man's greatest accomplishments, the Jaguar E-Type


E-Type Jag at 50 : BBC Top Gear from FlyingTV London on Vimeo.


It won't start.   Lmao
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#19
If you transplant a high performance Corvette small-block Chevy engine and transmission into a lovely, left-hand drive E-Type Jaguar, you can make it a lighter, faster, quicker handling, and more reliable hybrid British/American road car. Corvette style side exhausts are almost required due to lack of room past the rear driveline. The improved weight distribution needs different springs and better shocks. More modern wheels and tires would help, too. Those were fairly popular conversions back in the 60's and 70's. If you don't drag race it, the British drivetrain will hold up OK. The Lucas electrics will always cause issues if not re-wired and replaced. The car is too narrow, but that is part of its styling appeal.
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#20
(02-09-2022, 02:51 AM)PRIME Wrote: If you transplant a high performance Corvette small-block Chevy engine and transmission into a lovely, left-hand drive E-Type Jaguar, you can make it a lighter, faster, quicker handling, and more reliable hybrid British/American road car. Corvette style side exhausts are almost required due to lack of room past the rear driveline. The improved weight distribution needs different springs and better shocks. More modern wheels and tires would help, too. Those were fairly popular conversions back in the 60's and 70's. If you don't drag race it, the British drivetrain will hold up OK. The Lucas electrics will always cause issues if not re-wired and replaced. The car is too narrow, but that is part of its styling appeal.
Not Original. As they are to drive today. Only rich and those that hid them away get to experience the difference. Or lucky track days.
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