Extinct Species question....
#11
The red apple at the grocery that was delicious is extinct. The one they replaced it with is kinda meh...
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#12
(08-05-2022, 09:20 AM)Wingsprint Wrote: Vegetable Lamb of Tartary

Vegetable Lamb of Tartary - Wikipedia


Voynich manuscript - Wikipedia

ok...thats weird.

Pod people might be real.

Scream1
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#13
(08-05-2022, 09:22 AM)ishtahota Wrote:
(08-05-2022, 12:43 AM)Grendelmort Wrote: We always hear about extinct Species like Dinosaurs and Wooly Mammoths and even extinct Species during our lifetime like the Dodo Bird and the Passenger Pidgin.
But you never hear of extinct Fruits or Vegetables.
Has anyone ever heard of a edible plant, fruit or vegetable that used to exist but no longer does ?
Some writings in the in ancient Hindu text talk about food that no longer exists but does not say or describe what it was.


No, I haven't actually, however, I have heard of fruits that have NO mother plant, like Corn. It just POP'd into existence around 10,000 years ago

Like modern humans allegedly?

Chuckle
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#14
(08-05-2022, 12:43 AM)Grendelmort Wrote: We always hear about extinct Species like Dinosaurs and Wooly Mammoths and even extinct Species during our lifetime like the Dodo Bird and the Passenger Pidgin.
But you never hear of extinct Fruits or Vegetables.
Has anyone ever heard of a edible plant, fruit or vegetable that used to exist but no longer does ?
Some writings in the in ancient Hindu text talk about food that no longer exists but does not say or describe what it was.

Yes, there are a number of fossilized plant species which mainstream scientists claim lived hundreds of millions of years ago, and you can find them with search terms, and those who find it more probable a global flood caused them to perish maintain their age in only thousands of years. Some are only extant in cultivation, no longer in the wild, such as Franklinia alatamaha, kept by Ben Franklin, and the St. Helena olive tree, and the Easter Island Toromiro tree. For now at least, I've found these which were wiped out in the last century or so, not even remaining in cultivation:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valerianella_affinis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pluchea_glutinosa

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbexilum_stipulatum
“Judge, if you saw what I saw, you would know why I can’t release them” - President Donald J. Trump to Andrew Napolitano, about the J.F.K. Files.
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#15
Save the Puffins from global warming unt vankers
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#16
Was going to be nice and just Puffrin
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But due to Zom bots. The Japs are fuck'n stupid 
https://youtu.be/fmI1Sy2l2rY
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#17
Unfortunately, to prove that a fruit once existed you'd need to find remains somehow preserved.  Very difficult, not impossible. 

There are extant species going into extinction, though how long would be difficult to know.  Sycamore trees have waxy fruit which appear as small, oddly textured balls.  Some trees have them, though for some species of trees, it's not known what animal eats them, suggesting that perhaps an ancient or extinct creature once did but no longer.

Interesting article:

https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/6542...om-history
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#18
Shark fins.
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#19
(08-07-2022, 12:15 PM)PresidentElectSquirrel Wrote: Unfortunately, to prove that a fruit once existed you'd need to find remains somehow preserved.  Very difficult, not impossible. 

There are extant species going into extinction, though how long would be difficult to know.  Sycamore trees have waxy fruit which appear as small, oddly textured balls.  Some trees have them, though for some species of trees, it's not known what animal eats them, suggesting that perhaps an ancient or extinct creature once did but no longer.

Interesting article:

https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/6542...om-history
Excellent Article ! This is what I was looking for - thanks for the link.
Why Johnny Ringo, you look like someone just walked over your grave ...
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