What Are You Reading / Recommend a Book
#1
I'm getting close to finishing "The Jungle" by Upton Sinclair. It's been on my list for awhile.

All I can say is Chicago has been a dirty city for a very long time!
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#2
(01-15-2020, 07:24 PM)=42 Wrote: I'm getting close to finishing "The Jungle" by Upton Sinclair. It's been on my list for awhile.

All I can say is Chicago has been a dirty city for a very long time!
The Jungle was definitely a good book - read it about 10 years ago.
I just finished "Alien Agenda" by Jim Marrs.
If you like reading about UFO's and the cover-up, this is a well written read..
I've often felt that dreams are answers to questions we haven't yet figured out how to ask.
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#3
When you must read it again and again, that is the sign of a good book:
"Warpaint of The Gods" by Nila Sagadevan.  ISBN: 0-9762606-0-3
My mind, a field of battles, struggles for peace in a tight place.
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#4
The Source
by James Michener

The Source is a historical novel by James A. Michener, first published in 1965. It is a survey of the history of the Jewish people and the land of Israel from pre-monotheistic days to the birth of the modern State of Israel. The Source uses, for its central device, a fictional tell in northern Israel called "Makor" (Hebrew: "source"‎). Prosaically, the name comes from a freshwater well just north of Makor, but symbolically it stands for much more, historically and spiritually.

Unlike most Michener novels, this book is not in strict chronological order. A parallel frame story set in Israel in the 1960s supports the historical timeline. Archaeologists digging at the tell at Makor uncover artifacts from each layer, which then serve as the basis for a chapter exploring the lives of the people involved with that artifact. The book follows the story of the Family of Ur from a Stone Age family whose wife begins to believe that there is a supernatural force, which slowly leads us to the beginnings of monotheism. The descendants are not aware of the ancient antecedents revealed to the reader by the all-knowing writer as the story progresses through the Davidic kingdom, Hellenistic times, Roman times, etc. The site is continually inhabited until the end of the Crusades when it is destroyed by the victorious Mameluks (as happened to many actual cities after 1291) and is not rebuilt by the Ottomans.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Source_(novel)
"Don't try to Out-Smart me, I'm in College!"

--an Area 51 Raider
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#5
(01-15-2020, 08:15 PM)Max Gravity Wrote: The Source
by James Michener

The Source is a historical novel by James A. Michener, first published in 1965. It is a survey of the history of the Jewish people and the land of Israel from pre-monotheistic days to the birth of the modern State of Israel. The Source uses, for its central device, a fictional tell in northern Israel called "Makor" (Hebrew: "source"‎). Prosaically, the name comes from a freshwater well just north of Makor, but symbolically it stands for much more, historically and spiritually.

Unlike most Michener novels, this book is not in strict chronological order. A parallel frame story set in Israel in the 1960s supports the historical timeline. Archaeologists digging at the tell at Makor uncover artifacts from each layer, which then serve as the basis for a chapter exploring the lives of the people involved with that artifact. The book follows the story of the Family of Ur from a Stone Age family whose wife begins to believe that there is a supernatural force, which slowly leads us to the beginnings of monotheism. The descendants are not aware of the ancient antecedents revealed to the reader by the all-knowing writer as the story progresses through the Davidic kingdom, Hellenistic times, Roman times, etc. The site is continually inhabited until the end of the Crusades when it is destroyed by the victorious Mameluks (as happened to many actual cities after 1291) and is not rebuilt by the Ottomans.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Source_(novel)

Sounds interesting! I've never read any Michner.
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#6
(01-15-2020, 08:42 PM)=42 Wrote:
(01-15-2020, 08:15 PM)Max Gravity Wrote: The Source
by James Michener

The Source is a historical novel by James A. Michener, first published in 1965. It is a survey of the history of the Jewish people and the land of Israel from pre-monotheistic days to the birth of the modern State of Israel. The Source uses, for its central device, a fictional tell in northern Israel called "Makor" (Hebrew: "source"‎). Prosaically, the name comes from a freshwater well just north of Makor, but symbolically it stands for much more, historically and spiritually.

Unlike most Michener novels, this book is not in strict chronological order. A parallel frame story set in Israel in the 1960s supports the historical timeline. Archaeologists digging at the tell at Makor uncover artifacts from each layer, which then serve as the basis for a chapter exploring the lives of the people involved with that artifact. The book follows the story of the Family of Ur from a Stone Age family whose wife begins to believe that there is a supernatural force, which slowly leads us to the beginnings of monotheism. The descendants are not aware of the ancient antecedents revealed to the reader by the all-knowing writer as the story progresses through the Davidic kingdom, Hellenistic times, Roman times, etc. The site is continually inhabited until the end of the Crusades when it is destroyed by the victorious Mameluks (as happened to many actual cities after 1291) and is not rebuilt by the Ottomans.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Source_(novel)

Sounds interesting! I've never read any Michner.

He did amazing amounts of research for his books. The Archeology described in The Source makes it stand out. He traveled to the sites and saw much of it first hand.

If you want to laugh, and your noodle can process some weird shit..

Both, "V" and Gravity's Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon are two of my all time favorites.

Gravity's Rainbow is a 1973 novel by American writer Thomas Pynchon.
Lengthy, complex, and featuring a large cast of characters, the narrative is set primarily in Europe at the end of World War II, and centers on the design, production and dispatch of V-2 rockets by the German military. In particular, it features the quest undertaken by several characters to uncover the secret of a mysterious device named the "Schwarzgerät" ("black device"), slated to be installed in a rocket with the serial number "00000".
Traversing a wide range of knowledge, Gravity's Rainbow transgresses boundaries between high and low culture, between literary propriety and profanity, and between science and speculative metaphysics. It shared the 1974 U.S. National Book Award for Fiction with A Crown of Feathers and Other Stories by Isaac Bashevis Singer.[1] Although selected by the Pulitzer Prize jury on fiction for the 1974 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, the Pulitzer Advisory Board was offended by its content, some of which was described as "'unreadable,' 'turgid,' 'overwritten' and in parts 'obscene'".[2] No Pulitzer Prize was awarded for fiction that year.[2][3] The novel was nominated for the 1973 Nebula Award for Best Novel.[4]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity%27s_Rainbow


V. is the debut novel of Thomas Pynchon, published in 1963. It describes the exploits of a discharged U.S. Navy sailor named Benny Profane, his reconnection in New York with a group of pseudo-bohemian artists and hangers-on known as the Whole Sick Crew, and the quest of an aging traveler named Herbert Stencil to identify and locate the mysterious entity he knows only as "V." It was nominated for a National Book Award.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V.
"Don't try to Out-Smart me, I'm in College!"

--an Area 51 Raider
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#7
Being a Southerner, "The Yearling" or to "Kill a Mockingbird". Note: In the "The Yearling" my kinfolks are part of the story.
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#8
(01-15-2020, 09:06 PM)Max Gravity Wrote:
(01-15-2020, 08:42 PM)=42 Wrote:
(01-15-2020, 08:15 PM)Max Gravity Wrote: The Source
by James Michener

The Source is a historical novel by James A. Michener, first published in 1965. It is a survey of the history of the Jewish people and the land of Israel from pre-monotheistic days to the birth of the modern State of Israel. The Source uses, for its central device, a fictional tell in northern Israel called "Makor" (Hebrew: "source"‎). Prosaically, the name comes from a freshwater well just north of Makor, but symbolically it stands for much more, historically and spiritually.

Unlike most Michener novels, this book is not in strict chronological order. A parallel frame story set in Israel in the 1960s supports the historical timeline. Archaeologists digging at the tell at Makor uncover artifacts from each layer, which then serve as the basis for a chapter exploring the lives of the people involved with that artifact. The book follows the story of the Family of Ur from a Stone Age family whose wife begins to believe that there is a supernatural force, which slowly leads us to the beginnings of monotheism. The descendants are not aware of the ancient antecedents revealed to the reader by the all-knowing writer as the story progresses through the Davidic kingdom, Hellenistic times, Roman times, etc. The site is continually inhabited until the end of the Crusades when it is destroyed by the victorious Mameluks (as happened to many actual cities after 1291) and is not rebuilt by the Ottomans.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Source_(novel)

Sounds interesting! I've never read any Michner.

He did amazing amounts of research for his books. The Archeology described in The Source makes it stand out. He traveled to the sites and saw much of it first hand.

If you want to laugh, and your noodle can process some weird shit..

Both, "V" and Gravity's Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon are two of my all time favorites.

Gravity's Rainbow is a 1973 novel by American writer Thomas Pynchon.
Lengthy, complex, and featuring a large cast of characters, the narrative is set primarily in Europe at the end of World War II, and centers on the design, production and dispatch of V-2 rockets by the German military. In particular, it features the quest undertaken by several characters to uncover the secret of a mysterious device named the "Schwarzgerät" ("black device"), slated to be installed in a rocket with the serial number "00000".
Traversing a wide range of knowledge, Gravity's Rainbow transgresses boundaries between high and low culture, between literary propriety and profanity, and between science and speculative metaphysics. It shared the 1974 U.S. National Book Award for Fiction with A Crown of Feathers and Other Stories by Isaac Bashevis Singer.[1] Although selected by the Pulitzer Prize jury on fiction for the 1974 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, the Pulitzer Advisory Board was offended by its content, some of which was described as "'unreadable,' 'turgid,' 'overwritten' and in parts 'obscene'".[2] No Pulitzer Prize was awarded for fiction that year.[2][3] The novel was nominated for the 1973 Nebula Award for Best Novel.[4]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity%27s_Rainbow


V. is the debut novel of Thomas Pynchon, published in 1963. It describes the exploits of a discharged U.S. Navy sailor named Benny Profane, his reconnection in New York with a group of pseudo-bohemian artists and hangers-on known as the Whole Sick Crew, and the quest of an aging traveler named Herbert Stencil to identify and locate the mysterious entity he knows only as "V." It was nominated for a National Book Award.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V.

I've heard of those titles, but haven't read them, I was sure I read a Pynchon book, but couldn't remember it, I had to look it up. It was The Crying of Lot 49.
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#9
(01-15-2020, 09:06 PM)WNC Wrote: Being a Southerner, "The Yearling" or to "Kill a Mockingbird". Note: In the "The Yearling" my kinfolks are part of the story.

Harper Lee didn't write much but, when she did..

[Image: 450px-Harper_Lee_Medal.jpg]
"Don't try to Out-Smart me, I'm in College!"

--an Area 51 Raider
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#10
I'm reading
"How to blast Bach-Toccata & Fugue while having a martini and pissing off your liberal neighbor"
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